For Fans of Histories of Locale...



Title: The New Eldorado: The Story of Colorado's Gold and Silver Rushes
Author: Phyllis Flanders Dorset
Publisher: Fulcrum
Year: 1970
Call Number: 978.802 DOR

For fans of histories of locale, those interested in gold and/or silver rushes, and Civil War buffs who might want to know about what was going on west of the Mississippi River during the Civil War era, Phyllis Flanders Dorset’s The New Eldorado: The Story of Colorado’s Gold and Silver Rushes provides the right mix of the three. This book has been around a while. Although it was published in 1970, the library has obtained new copies of this wonderful somewhat journalistic, somewhat chatty treatment of the wild-and-wooly days of the mining territory in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The book focuses on the large-scale settlement of Colorado by argonauts hoping to discover precious metal fortunes like the ones being discovered in California’s gold fields in the mid-1800s, and those who came to Colorado in their wake. These settlers entered the lands of the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Ute, and the mountain men who were sometimes intermarried into the tribes. It describes the origins of early mining settlements such as Central City, Blackhawk, Georgetown, Telluride, Buckskin Joe, Fairplay, and Cripple Creek. In addition to maps of these early mining settlements, there is a wonderful section of period photos (many courtesy of the Denver Public Library) that contains images including William Jennings Bryan, Margaret Tobin Brown (the Unsinkable Molly Brown of Titanic fame), and what is thought to be Annie Oakley, in addition to other United States and Colorado history notables.  For those of you who like road trips, if you are ever planning a trip through Colorado—especially through the Rockies—this colorful and informative look at the people and history of  Colorado should spark your imagination as you visit the places the book brings to life. The book contains an index and bibliographical references making it a good resource for research.

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